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20121225
20121225
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, right now, the nra is on its heels, defenders of our insanely permissive gun laws are in a defensive crouch right now, and it's the time that you want to capitalize on that. it's probably the only time. you don't want to let those forces. we don't want to let my sense of complacency set back or let the forces that are standing in the way of progress on this issue allow them time to regroup and bolster their efforts that are going to exist. this is not going to be an easy thing to get done. it's not. mika, you look at what happened, how it happened. we talked about this happening in shopping malls in oregon and movie theaters in colorado. college campuses in virginia. of course, finally a first grade class in connecticut, in a state that certainly has tougher gun laws than, say, a lot of other red states. in a community that seems like it should have been so shielded from this, in a season that is supposed to be about peace. >> exactly. >> i think it underlined in so many ways why none of us, none of us are shielded from this kind of violence, unless we force our leaders to do somethi
, enforce the laws. yes, i know. determined killers will always find a way, but we can minimize the opportunities and scale back the scope of destruction. why do we accept the need for driver's licenses or submit to the sometimes humiliating body scans at airports? because it's the law, and deep down we know we're safer for the inconvenience of the law. good laws are hard to come by. civilization, just as hard. the rough and tumble of politics makes them so. but democracy aims for a moral order as just as humanly possible, which means laws that protect the weak and not just the strong. lest we forget. >>> we've seen throughout our history what happens when politics doesn't work, when democracy breaks down. the greatest, most heartbreaking problem was the failure toll solve slavery, a failure that l led to civil war. even then, it took a last act of political courage and prowess to permanently abolish slavery with the 13th amendment to the constitution. this is the story told in the beautiful motion picture "lincoln" starring daniel day lewis and sally field. the film presents th
was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you ha
into law -- created the environmental protection agency. one of the first orders of business of the ecb the a was to ban a series of insecticides starting with ddt and including all of its cousins, many of which were more toxic than ddt. the domestic ban went into effect in 1972. began phasing them out and it is too bad carson didn't live to see that but she didn't and i like to think of her in this photograph taken by her friends the freeman family who lived next door to her in maine on the shoreline of southport island in 1955, of my favorite photographs of her. she looks very content in this picture and someone who was at home in that environment and at home in the world and at home in her role as an author, scientist and ultimately somebody who would change the way we think about things. that is a good place to stop and take any questions you have. >> anybody have any questions? >> why was the book called "silent spring"? >> why was the book called "silent spring"? that probably stems from the opening chapter in which she described a spring in which the birds are absent from the tow
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4